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The Evolution of American Bioethics: A Sociological Perspective

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Social Science Perspectives on Medical Ethics

Part of the book series: Culture, Illness, and Healing ((CIHE,volume 16))

Abstract

“Bioethics” is a social and cultural, as well as an intellectual happening. The term came into use toward the end of the 1960s, in connection with an area of inquiry and action that was just beginning to develop in the United States at that time. What has since become the flourishing field of bioethics is structured around problems associated with modern biomedicine, particularly some of its frontier scientific and technological advances. But bioethics is not just the name of a new discipline. It also refers to a wider, progressively more organized, professional and public concern about these so-called ethical matters that has taken on some of the contours and characteristics of a social movement.

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© 1990 Kluwer Academic Publishers

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Fox, R.C. (1990). The Evolution of American Bioethics: A Sociological Perspective. In: Weisz, G. (eds) Social Science Perspectives on Medical Ethics. Culture, Illness, and Healing, vol 16. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-1930-3_11

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-1930-3_11

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Dordrecht

  • Print ISBN: 978-94-010-7361-5

  • Online ISBN: 978-94-009-1930-3

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive

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