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Deforestation and Forest Plantations in Ethiopia

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Part of the Environmental Science and Technology Library book series (ENST,volume 10)

Abstract

Long term human occupation of the highlands of Ethiopia, accompanied by sedentary agriculture and extensive cattle herding activities, in combination with population pressure have resulted in the heavy deforestation, and subsequent environmental degradation. According to historical estimates, nearly 90% of Ethiopian highland had forest cover. Presently only less than 6% have closed forest cover. If properly managed, plantations not only play a vital role in alleviating the wood shortages, but also assist in checking environmental degradation and in the rehabilitation of degraded sites. Presently, there are thousand of hectares of forest plantations with very simplified ecosystems containing only pure stands of eucalypts. Mixed forest plantations can also be found. Participation of the local people and the existence of clear and firm land tenure rights are crucial for the long-term sustainability and the expansion of forest plantations. In general, tree planting should be an integral part of the rural development programs and should provide the community with social, economic and environmental benefits. Mixed forest plantations and the inclusion of promising indigenous tree species in plantation forestry should be given serious consideration.

Keywords

  • Ethiopia
  • forest plantations
  • deforestation
  • natural forests

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Yirdaw, E. (1996). Deforestation and Forest Plantations in Ethiopia. In: Palo, M., Mery, G. (eds) Sustainable Forestry Challenges for Developing Countries. Environmental Science and Technology Library, vol 10. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-1588-6_18

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-1588-6_18

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Dordrecht

  • Print ISBN: 978-94-010-7211-3

  • Online ISBN: 978-94-009-1588-6

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