Transformational School Leadership

  • Kenneth Leithwood
  • Diana Tomlinson
  • Maxine Genge
Chapter
Part of the Kluwer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 1)

Abstract

Transformational leadership is a term which has appeared with increasing frequency in writings about education since the late 1980’s. Sometimes it has been used to signify an appropriate type of leadership for schools taking up the challenges of restructuring now well underway in most developed countries throughout the world (Leithwood, 1992). In this context, a common-sense, non-technical meaning of the term is often assumed. For example, the dictionary definition of transform is ‘to change completely or essentially in composition or structure’ (Webster, 1971). So any leadership with this effect may be labelled transformational, no matter the specific practices it entails or even whether the changes wrought are desirable.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth Leithwood
    • 1
  • Diana Tomlinson
    • 1
  • Maxine Genge
    • 1
  1. 1.Ontario Institute for Studies in EducationCanada

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