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Use of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils for Preparation of Modified Phenol Formaldehyde Resins

  • Stephen S. Kelley
  • Xiang-Ming Wang
  • Michele D. Myers
  • David K. Johnson
  • John W. Scahill

Abstract

Fast pyrolysis can be used to convert a wide variety of biomass feedstocks into a liquid oil. A phenolic-rich (PN) component can be extracted from this oil and used as a low-cost replacement for petroleum-derived phenol in phenol formaldehyde (PF) resins. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed an extraction process to recover this PN fraction, and it has demonstrated the performance of these PN oils in modified PF wood adhesives. Experience has shown that the performance of PN-PF wood adhesives depends on the chemical features of the PN.

This work investigates how PN’s chemical reactivity and molecular architecture affected the properties of the PN-PF resin. Differences in the chemical features of the PN fraction have a distinct impact on the performance of PF resins. Differences in the reactivity and the functionality of the PN, relative to trifunctional, monomelic phenol must be considered during the preparation of PN-PF resins. When 25 weight percent of the monomelic phenol was replaced with PN the performance properties of properly formulated PN/PF resins compared favorably with those of commercial PF resins.

Key Words

Pyrolysis oils Phenolics and Neutrals Gel Theory Wood Bonding 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen S. Kelley
    • 1
  • Xiang-Ming Wang
    • 1
  • Michele D. Myers
    • 1
  • David K. Johnson
    • 1
  • John W. Scahill
    • 1
  1. 1.National Renewable Energy LaboratoryGoldenUSA

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