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Quality of stored cereals

  • J. T. Mills

Abstract

Cereal grains are subject to quality loss during storage and transportation, often resulting in considerable diminution in grade and value. Quality loss is of concern to many persons in the grain industry including producers, elevator managers, shippers, regulators, exporters, and purchasers, both domestic and foreign. Considerable research has been carried out to study, detect, and prevent loss in quality of stored grains and their products during storage. The work has been undertaken from diverse viewpoints, involving the disciplines of biochemistry, mycology, entomology, toxicology, food science, ecology and agricultural engineering. It is known that quality loss in stored grains is caused mainly by deterioration, a natural process which breaks down organic matter through either physical/chemical processes or biological processes where contained nutrients and energy are used by other life forms. The effects of deterioration can be considerably diminished through careful stored grain management based on a knowledge of the principles governing deterioration and by knowledge of the storage behaviour of the particular grains involved.

Keywords

Moisture Level Quality Loss Mould Growth Weed Seed Storage Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • J. T. Mills

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