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A Feature-Based Categorial Morpho-Syntax for Japanese

  • Pete J. Whitelock
Part of the Studies in Linguistics and Philosophy book series (SLAP, volume 35)

Abstract

This paper describes an experiment to investigate the characterisation of Japanese morpho-syntax within a lexicalist framework. It forms part of a study into English and Japanese grammars from the parochial, contrastive and universal viewpoints, which is intended to support the implementation of machine translation systems between the two languages.

Keywords

Relative Clause Lexical Entry Unification Categorial Input String Categorial Grammar 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pete J. Whitelock
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Artificial IntelligenceUniversity of EdinburghUK

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