The Importance of Barley in Food Production and Demand in West Asia and North Africa

  • K. Somel
Part of the Current Topics in Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science book series (CTVM, volume 47)

Abstract

Within West Asia and North Africa (WANA) 1 there is a wide spectrum of environmental conditions, from the areas of higher rainfall around the Mediterranean and of high elevation in central and eastern Turkey, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Ethiopia, and the Atlas mountains, to the drier steppe and desert areas. Irrigated agriculture is important along the principal rivers but most agricultural land is rainfed. Although there are land reserves in Sudan and Ethiopia, the limits of agricultural land have been reached in all the other countries of the region. Therefore, increases in agricultural production are possible only through increasing the intensity of crop production and yields. There is also a wide spectrum of social and economic conditions, with substantial differences within the region in incomes, urbanization, agricultural policies, and the degree of public control over production and resources.

Keywords

Livestock Production Carcass Weight Native Pasture Barley Grain AT2000 File 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ICARDA 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Somel

There are no affiliations available

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