Physiopathological aspects of plasma cell dyscrasias: A forum

  • Bart Barlogie
  • R. A. Coward
  • Alan Solomon
  • J. N. Buxbaum
  • Raymond Alexanian
  • Gloria Gallo
  • Jean-Louis Preud’Homme
  • Jacob B. Natvig
  • Dorothea Zucker-Franklin
  • G. D’Amico
  • Arthur H. Cohen
  • Robert A. Kyle
Part of the Developments in Nephrology book series (DINE, volume 22)

Abstract

BARLOGIE: High RNA content is associated with immunoglobulin production and perhaps one might speculate the high RNA reflects more differentiated plasma cells. On the other hand, CALLA is considered to be a very early B-cell marker. One could speculate on why a primitive marker is preserved in a more differentiated plasma cell and what that means. There is however a wide dispersion in plasma cell RNA content differing in the individual patient by factor as high as 20-fold. We suspected that a considerable RNA bioeterogeneity would also be expressed otherwise, i.e. we are looking for means to relate to each other the RNA and phenotype expression. We speculate that RNA as an indicator merely of potential protein synthesis would be fairly low in myeloma progenitor cells. Thus, CALLA-positive cells, not co-expressing cytoplasmic immunoglobulin, probably have low RNA content. But I’ve no good idea why the CALLA antigen is maintained and is not shut off as cells progress down the differentiation pathway.

Keywords

Light Chain Mesangial Cell Amyloid Fibril Lambda Light Chain Plasma Cell Dyscrasia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bart Barlogie
    • 1
  • R. A. Coward
  • Alan Solomon
    • 2
  • J. N. Buxbaum
  • Raymond Alexanian
    • 3
  • Gloria Gallo
    • 4
  • Jean-Louis Preud’Homme
    • 5
  • Jacob B. Natvig
    • 6
  • Dorothea Zucker-Franklin
    • 7
  • G. D’Amico
  • Arthur H. Cohen
    • 8
  • Robert A. Kyle
    • 9
  1. 1.Department of HematologyM.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor InstituteHoustonUSA
  2. 2.University of Tennessee Medical Center at KnoxvilleKnoxvilleUSA
  3. 3.University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor InstituteHoustonUSA
  4. 4.Department of PathologyNew York University School of Medicine, NYU Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  5. 5.Laboratory of Immunology and Immunopathology (CNRS VA 1172)Poitiers University HospitalPoitiers CedexFrance
  6. 6.Institute of Immunology and Rheumatology, RikshospitaletOslo 1Norway
  7. 7.University Hospital, Room 445, Department of MedicineNew York University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  8. 8.Department of PathologyHarbor-UCLA Medical CenterTorranceUSA
  9. 9.Mayo Clinic and Mayo FoundationRochesterUSA

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