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The Nature of an Ethylene Biosynthesis-Inducing Factor Found in Cellulysin

  • Yoram Fuchs
  • Abha Saxena
  • H. Ray Gamble
  • James D. Anderson
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Agricultural Biotechnology book series (AABI, volume 26)

Abstract

The proteinaceous ethylene biosynthsis-inducin factor (EIF) that was isolated from Cellulysin was shown to contain a xylanase activity. In all non-denaturing protein separation methods employed (Sephacryl S-200 chromatography, preparative isoelectric focusing and agarose electrophoresis), xylanase activity co-purified with the ethylene biosynthesis-inducing activity. Treatment with heat (60°C) or proteases in 8 M urea inhibited both ethylen biosynthesis-inducing and xylanase activities. Antibodies raised against EIF immunoprecipitated both ethylene biosynyhesis-inducing and xylanase activities. The purified EIF contained no detectable cellulase, polygalacturonase, protease or other hydrolytic activities as estimated by using p-nitrophenyl derivatives of several sugars as substrates. Based on these data, we suggest that EIF contains a specific xylanase activity which is involved in inducing ethylene biosynthesis.

Keywords

Xylanase Activity Ethylene Biosynthesis Birch Wood Xylan Pear Fruit Agarose Electrophoresis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoram Fuchs
    • 1
    • 2
  • Abha Saxena
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Ray Gamble
    • 1
    • 2
  • James D. Anderson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department Of Fruit And Vegetable StorageARO, The Volcani CenterBet DaganIsrael
  2. 2.United States Department Of Agricalture, Agricultural Research Service, Plant Hormone Laboratory, Helminthic Disease LaboratoryBARCBeltsvilleUSA

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