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Induction of Autocatalytic Ethylene Production and Ripening by Propylene in “Hayward ”Kiwifruit

  • E. Sfakiotakis
  • G. Stavroulakis
  • P. Ververidis
  • D. Gerasopoulos
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Agricultural Biotechnology book series (AABI, volume 26)

Abstract

Kiwifruit treated with propylene at concentrations of 0, 10, 50, 100 and 500 ppm for one week at 20°C stimulated ethylene production and induced the fruit for ripening as it was evaluated by determining the flesh firmness and the increase in soluble solids content. Its ability to stimulate ethylene production and ripening increased with propylene concentration. However, it was noticed that the ripening induced by propylene was initiated before the onset of ethylene synthesis.The threshold concentration of propylene for the induction of ethylene production and ripening was higher than 10 ppm. The concentration of 100 ppm propylene was a saturated dose for the induction of autocatalytic ethylene production. The same concentrations of propylene (0, 10, 50, 100, 500 ppm) applied for 3 weeks at 0°C induced ripening of the fruit but did not stimulate ethylene production. Low temperature at 0° C delayed softening of the fruit by 2 weeks as compared to that induced by 100 ppm propylene at 20° C. It is concluded that low temperature blocked initiation of autocatalytic ethylene production but not the ripening of kiwifruit.

Keywords

Ethylene Production Soluble Solid Content Apple Fruit Propylene Concentration Climacteric Fruit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Sfakiotakis
    • 1
  • G. Stavroulakis
    • 1
  • P. Ververidis
    • 1
  • D. Gerasopoulos
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of PomologyAristotelian UniversityThessalonikiGreece

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