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Human gastric acid secretion and intragastric acidity

  • R. E. Pounder

Abstract

Since the mid-1970s, there has been a move away from the assessment of gastric secretion of acid by man in response to a single pharmacological stimulus to either the measurement of ‘natural’ gastric acid secretion in response to a whole meal or the measurement of intragastric acidity (which is the end-result of not only gastric acid secretion, but also food and liquid taken by mouth and also gastric emptying).

Keywords

Duodenal Ulcer Acid Secretion Gastric Acid Secretion Pernicious Anaemia Duodenal Ulcer Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© MTP Press Limited 1988

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  • R. E. Pounder

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