Status of Exploitation of Atalantic Salmon in Salmon in Scotland

  • R. B. Williamson

Abstract

Salmon have been exploited in Scotland since the earliest times and it is clear from Boece’s History of Scotland, 1527, that they were considered an important resource and that local fishermen had a good working knowledge of the biology of the fish long before the scientific discoveries of later centuries (Neill, 1946). The many salmon laws passed in the twelth to seventeenth centuries also give some indication of the value of the fish. In economic terms, exploitation of salmon may be less important now than then but the increased recreational use of the resource offsets the decline in the relative importance of the annual production of fish.

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Copyright information

© The Atlantic Salmon Trust 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. B. Williamson

There are no affiliations available

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