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Rabies vaccines

  • K. G. Nicholson
Part of the Immunology and Medicine book series (IMME, volume 12)

Abstract

Rabies is an acute infectious encephalomyelitis caused by a Lyssavirus, a bullet-shaped virus belonging to the Rhabdovirus family. The disease is uniformly fatal in man once symptoms and signs develop. Nevertheless its ‘disease burden value’ is low in comparison with other infectious diseases, so rabies is not generally considered a priority for vaccine development or delivery. The true extent of human rabies is unknown but as many as 100 000 deaths are believed to occur annually. Rabies is prevalent throughout most of the world and many millions of doses of vaccine are given each year following genuine or possible exposures to the virus. Comparatively little is given for pre-exposure prophylaxis.

Keywords

Rabies Virus Rabies Vaccine Human Diploid Cell Human Rabies Duck Embryo 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

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  • K. G. Nicholson

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