Application of Photon Correlation Spectroscopy to the Study of Diffusional Dynamics in Compatible Polymer Blends

  • J. Kanetakis
  • A. Rizos
  • G. Fytas
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASIC, volume 291)

Abstract

Photon correlation spectroscopy has been employed to measure dynamic and static structure factor in compatible polymer blends. For the poly(ethylene oxide)(PEO)/poly(propylene oxide)(PPO) blend containing a volume fraction φ=0.87 of PEO and with constant molecular weight of PPO, the mutual diffusion and transport coefficients, D and Do, decrease with the degree of polymerization NPEO of the PEO component. The D° coefficient exhibits a weak NPEO dependence in accord with the “fast mode theory” of mutual diffusion. For the PPO/polystyrene (PS) mixture at extremely low concentrations of PS we have been able to detect for the first time to our knowledge two distinct concentration dependences of the coefficient D.

Keywords

Ethylene Oxide Propylene Oxide Transport Coefficient Tracer Diffusion Mutual Diffusion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Kanetakis
    • 1
  • A. Rizos
    • 1
  • G. Fytas
    • 1
  1. 1.Foundation for Research and Technology — Hellas and Chemistry DepartmentUniversity of CreteHeraklion, CreteGreece

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