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Compressed Planetary and Lunar Ephemerides

  • Peter Kammeyer

Abstract

A package of FORTRAN software has been developed which provides planetary and lunar positions, with respect to the solar system barycenter, for all times in the interval 18012049; positions agree to 1 milliarcsecond with those generated by Jet Propulsion Laboratory Development Ephemeris 200 (DE200). The system consists of approximately 800 kilobytes of ephemeris files and 40 kilobytes of programs, totalling 5% of the storage required by DE200. After removal of reference orbits, segments of DE200 positions were fitted by finite Chebyshev series of degree 40. The Chebyshev coefficients were rounded to integer multiples of a suitable unit and packed to form the ephemeris files.

Keywords

Chebyshev Polynomial Astronomical Unit Reference Orbit Integer Coefficient Julian Date 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Kammeyer
    • 1
  1. 1.United States Naval ObservatoryUSA

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