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The Birmingham Blood Lead Studies

  • P. G. Harvey
  • M. W. Hamlin
  • R. Kumar
  • J. Morgan
  • A. Spurgeon
  • T. Delves

Summary

Two separate studies are described in which young children (one sample aged 2.5 years and one aged 5.5 years) were assessed on a wide variety of cognitive, neuropsychological and behavioural parameters. Blood lead concentration, derived from a single sample of venous blood, was the indicator of lead body-burden. Extensive measures of family characteristics were also taken.

The results show that both samples had generally low blood lead concentrations with means of 15.6 μg dl-1 and 12.8 μg dl-1 for the younger and older sample respectively. In general, there were few significant relationships between blood lead and the outcome measures on initial analysis and those that did arise were small. Multivariate analysis showed that even fewer remained significant after accounting for confounding variables.

Caution is expressed at interpreting and generalizing these results to other populations.

Keywords

Lead Exposure Blood Lead Level Blood Lead Concentration Vigilance Performance British Ability Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Delves, H.T. (1970). A microsampling method for the rapid determination of lead in blood by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Analyst, 95, 431–438PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Department of the Environment (1983). European Community Screening Programme for Lead: United Kingdom Results for 1981. (Pollution Report 18 ). ( London: Department of the Environment )Google Scholar
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  4. Harvey, P.G., Hamlin, M.W. and Kumar, R. (1983). The Birmingham blood lead study. Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society, YorkGoogle Scholar
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  7. Harvey, P.G., Hamlin, M.W., Kumar, R., Morgan, J., Spurgeon, A. and Delves, H.T. (1988). Relationships between blood lead, behaviour, psychometric and neuropsychological test performance in young children. Br. J. Dev. Psychol, 6, 145–156CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© ECSC-EEC-EAEC, Brussels — Luxembourg; EPA, USA 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. G. Harvey
  • M. W. Hamlin
  • R. Kumar
  • J. Morgan
  • A. Spurgeon
  • T. Delves

There are no affiliations available

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