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Isolation and purification of reaction products

  • J. T. Sharp
  • I. Gosney
  • A. G. Rowley

Abstract

Preparative organic reactions rarely give a complete conversion of the starting material into the required product. In a good ‘synthetic’ reaction a yield of product of 70–80% or more would be expected, but in addition there may be small amounts of other organic materials formed as by-products. In some cases reactions also produce polymeric ‘tarry’ material, which may be a brown or yellow colour. In addition to these organic products, many reactions also produce equimolar amounts of inorganic products, e.g. the metal halides produced in a typical ether synthesis:
$$\textup{RCH}_{2}\textup{Br}\ +\textup{NaOCH}_{3}\rightarrow \textup{RCH}_{2}\textup{OCH}_{3}\ +\textup{NaBr}$$

Keywords

Mother Liquor Vacuum Distillation Steam Distillation Capillary Leak Light Petroleum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Burfield, D. R. and Smithers, R. H. (1982) J. Cbem. Educ, 59, 703.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 1.
    Riddick, J. A. and Burger, W. B. (1970) Organic Solvents: Physical Properties and Methods of Purification, in Techniques of Chemistry, 3rd edn, vol. 2, Wiley Interscience, New York.Google Scholar
  3. 2.
    Gordon, A. J. and Ford, R. A. (1972) The Chemists Companion, Wiley Interscience, New York.Google Scholar
  4. 3.
    Burfield, D. R. (1982) J. Org. Chem., 47, 3821.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© J. T. Sharp, I. Gosney and A. G. Rowley 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. T. Sharp
    • 1
  • I. Gosney
    • 1
  • A. G. Rowley
  1. 1.University of EdinburghUK

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