A selection of signatures, 1635–1642

  • J. Bruyn
  • B. Haak
  • S. H. Levie
  • P. J. J. Van Thiel
  • E. Van De Wetering
Part of the Stichting Foundation Rembrandt Research Project book series (RRSE, volume 3)

Abstract

In our assessment of paintings the signature has always played a very subordinate role; and where the material contained in the present volume is concerned, too, this approach will prove to be justified. Comparison of the inscriptions on these works shows time and again that the borderline between signatures that convince one as being autograph and those that do not does not at all coincide with that between paintings that can be seen as autograph and those that are unacceptable as such. This chapter will not do much more than illustrate this general truth; for a deeper insight one would need more facts and greater expertise — facts about the stratification of the paint at the point in question (where an intervening layer of varnish can point to a later addition), and expertise in the analysis of handwriting, which would allow us with greater precision to recognize Rembrandt’s own hand.

Keywords

Present Volume National Gallery Workshop Assistant Authentic Signature Genuine Signature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 5.
    For Bol’s signatures see, besides Blankert Bol pp. 31–34, Sumowski Gemälde I, nos. 78 and 79, and J. Bruyn in: O.H. 97 (1983), pp. 211–213 with illus.Google Scholar
  2. 6.
    C. Brown, Carel Fabritius, Oxford 1981, pl. 9.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Stichting Foundation Rembrandt Research Project 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Bruyn
  • B. Haak
  • S. H. Levie
  • P. J. J. Van Thiel
  • E. Van De Wetering

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations