Principles and practice of sulphide mineral flotation

  • R. Herrera-Urbina
  • J. S. Hanson
  • G. H. Harris
  • D. W. Fuerstenau

Synopsis

This paper presents both the fundamentals of sulphide mineral flotation and the practical aspects of sulphide ore flotation. The fundamental aspects of the flotation of sulphide minerals both in the absence and presence of thiol collectors are discussed in relation to their crystal structure, surface chemistry and electrochemical characteristics. Since the electrochemistry of the sulphide mineral/aqueous solution interface and of various sulphide mineral/aqueous thio-compound systems has been amply investigated over the past two decades, the results of these modern electrochemical studies are briefly reviewed. Mechanisms of the action of various flotation reagents, including collectors, activators and depressants, commonly used in sulphide mineral flotation are discussed in terms of the chemical and electrochemical principles presented within this paper. Simplified flow sheets of representative flotation plant operations are given to illustrate how these principles are applied for the commercial separation of sulphide minerals from their ores. Various novel techniques that take advantage of controlling the electrochemical and physical behavior of the flotation system are also presented.

Keywords

Sulphide Mineral Flotation Reagent Froth Flotation Ethyl Xanthate Sulphide Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Institution of Mining and Metallurgy 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Herrera-Urbina
    • 1
  • J. S. Hanson
    • 1
  • G. H. Harris
    • 1
  • D. W. Fuerstenau
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Materials Science and Mineral EngineeringUniversity of California at BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA

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