Variables in the shear flocculation of galena

  • T. V. Subrahmanyam
  • Z. Sun
  • K. S. E. Forssberg
  • W. Forsling

Synopsis

Like froth flotation the shear flocculation is governed by the physical, chemical and geometrical variables. Among the important factors which influence the particle aggregation are the particle size, hydrophobicity, charge and the intensity of agitation. The present paper investigates the effect of different variables on the shear flocculation of (1). galena and (2). synthetic PbS. Since flocculation is influenced both by the charge and the hydrophobicity of the particle the zeta potentials were measured for different experimental conditions. The reaction mechanisms of PbS surfaces in aqueous solutions are examined based on the results; of electrokinetic- and potentiometric titration- studies. In comparison to conventional flotation, higher recoveries were obtained with shear flocculated aggregates. The results are discussed.

Keywords

Zeta Potential Coarse Particle Colloid Journal Froth Flotation Flotation Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Institution of Mining and Metallurgy 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. V. Subrahmanyam
    • 1
  • Z. Sun
    • 2
  • K. S. E. Forssberg
    • 1
  • W. Forsling
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Mineral ProcessingLuleå University of TechnologyLuleåSweden
  2. 2.Division of Inorganic ChemistryLuleå University of TechnologyLuleåSweden

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