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Determination of Petroleum Accumulation Histories: Examples from the Ula Field, Central Graben, Norwegian North Sea

  • S. R. Larter
  • K. O. Bjørlykke
  • D. A. Karlsen
  • T. Nedkvitne
  • T. Eglinton
  • P. E. Johansen
  • D. Leythaeuser
  • P. C. Mason
  • A. W. Mitchell
  • G. A. Newcombe

Abstract

The application of coupled geological and geochemical studies of oilfields can provide information on the maturity of the source rocks that fed the field, the directions of filling and estimates on the timing of accumulation development. In this ongoing study, detailed three-dimensional compositional mapping of the Ula Field permitted the selection of samples for more detailed molecular analysis, providing data on both source facies and maturity. It was observed from these data that, in addition to the expected lateral variations in chemical composition, vertical variations are also evident. Furthermore, local polar compound concentrations (small tar mats that are chemically relatable to the accumulation) are definable on a stratigraphic basis. Despite these chemical compositional variations and maturity differences, the petroleum column in the Ula Field appears mechanically stable. Indeed, the observed chemical compositional variations and the mechanical properties of the field are consistent with Late Tertiary filling as indicated by maturation modelling of maturity parameters.

Keywords

Source Rock Vitrinite Reflectance Petroleum Accumulation Drill Stem Test Jurassic Reservoir 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Norwegian Institute of Technology 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. R. Larter
    • 1
  • K. O. Bjørlykke
    • 1
  • D. A. Karlsen
    • 1
  • T. Nedkvitne
    • 1
  • T. Eglinton
    • 1
  • P. E. Johansen
    • 1
  • D. Leythaeuser
    • 1
  • P. C. Mason
    • 2
  • A. W. Mitchell
    • 2
  • G. A. Newcombe
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of GeologyUniversity of OsloOsloNorway
  2. 2.BP Petroleum Development Norway A/SForusNorway

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