Immobilization of Radioactive Wastes by Hydrothermal Hot Pressing

  • Kazumichi Yanagisawa
  • Mamoru Nishioka
  • Nakamichi Yamasaki

Abstract

The immobilization of high-level radioactive wastes into borosilicate glass is the most popular process to produce waste forms. The process is appealing because of its relative simplicity and utilization of conventional glass-making technology. In a recent quantitative evaluation of candidate waste forms, the high process rating for borosilicate glass and its intermediate product performance score resulted in the overall top-ranking position.1 It is, however, obvious that glass is thermodynamically unstable relative to a chemically equivalent assemblage of crystalline phases.2 Under some circumstances, it may devitrify to form the stable crystalline assemblage.

Keywords

Compressive Strength Radioactive Waste Nuclear Waste Silica Matrix High Compressive Strength 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Science Publishers LTD 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazumichi Yanagisawa
    • 1
  • Mamoru Nishioka
    • 1
  • Nakamichi Yamasaki
    • 1
  1. 1.Kochi UniversityKochi-shiJapan

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