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Apolipoprotein profile of a sample of Italian population. Correlations with coronary risk factors

  • A. Capurso
  • M. Di Tommaso
  • A. M. Mogavero
  • F. Resta
  • S. Palmisano
  • D. Ciancia
  • R. Taverniti
  • G. Angelini

Abstract

Serum apolipoproteins (apo) A-I, A-II, B, C-II, C-III and E have been evaluated by R.I.D. in a population sample of nine italian cities, for a total of 490 males and 530 females, aged 20 to 60. The correlations among apolipoproteins and between apolipoproteins and some coronary risk factors (age, body mass index, blood pressure, glycemia, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, smoke) have been calculated. In males, apo B was significantly correlated with age, blood mean pressure, total cholesterol, apo A-II and apo C-III. Apo A-I was significantly correlated only with apo A-II. Apo C-III was correlated also with apo E. In females, apo B was inversely correlated with body mass index and positively correlated with age and apo A-II. Moreover, apo C-II was correlated with apo C-III and apo E.

Keywords

Italian Population Coronary Risk Factor Italian City Serum Apolipoprotein Wide Research Programme 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Capurso
    • 1
  • M. Di Tommaso
    • 1
  • A. M. Mogavero
    • 1
  • F. Resta
    • 1
  • S. Palmisano
    • 1
  • D. Ciancia
    • 1
  • R. Taverniti
    • 1
  • G. Angelini
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Clinical MedicineUniversity of Bari Medical School, PoliclinicoBariItaly

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