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Nutrition habits in free living community: the Brisighella Study

  • G. L. Magri
  • A. Dormi
  • G. De Simone
  • G. B. Sisca
  • M. A. Cavina
  • S. D’Addato
  • A. Romagnoli
  • Z. Sangiorgi
  • M. L. Borlotti
  • E. Faggioli
  • G. Negro
  • G. C. Descovich

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to evaluate the importance of the combination of the major components of lipid intake and the possible interrelationship between vitamin intake and cardiovascular deaths in an observational longitudinal survey: the Brisighella Study. A population sample with diet P/S ratio (polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids) over the third quintile and saturated fatty acids/1000 calories (C), lipids/1000 C, diet cholesterol under the third quintile was isolated to define an arbitrarily “correct diet” opposite to the “rich diet”. The arbitrarily correct diet and the rich diet samples showed clearly different coronary mortality and morbidity rates (no pathology in the correct diet group). These characteristics emphasize the “per se” independent role of diet in the development of coronary heart disease.

Vitamin intakes were divided in quintiles at the 1980 examination and death causes included the period 1980–1987 (in this way the period 1972–1980 was verified and only the apparently healthy subjects at 1980 were considered). The percentage of fatal new events was elaborated for coronary heart disease (CHD) and for all cardiovascular diseases (CVD).

Our observations suggest a possible protective role of vitamins A, C and E dietary intakes against CHD and CVD.

Keywords

Coronary Heart Disease Saturated Fatty Acid Methyl Linoleate Daily Food Intake Lipid Intake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. L. Magri
    • 1
  • A. Dormi
    • 1
  • G. De Simone
    • 1
  • G. B. Sisca
    • 1
  • M. A. Cavina
    • 1
  • S. D’Addato
    • 1
  • A. Romagnoli
    • 1
  • Z. Sangiorgi
    • 1
  • M. L. Borlotti
    • 1
  • E. Faggioli
    • 1
  • G. Negro
    • 1
  • G. C. Descovich
    • 1
  1. 1.Atherosclerosis CenterUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly

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