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Sea Level Rise and Artificial Groundwater Recharge. A Study on the Feasibility of Geohydrologic Management

  • Albert J. Roebert
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASIC, volume 325)

Abstract

Intercepting 1% of the global rainfall of a one year period and storing it by artificial recharge in the subsurface of semi-arid areas could lead to a drop in sea level of less than 15 mm. Artificial recharge for this purpose is not the solution to the problem of sea level rise. “Geohydrologic management”, as defined by Fairbridge is not deemed feasible. Artificial recharge of 1% of the global annual rainfall means die equivalent of 110 times the artificial recharge in the State of California, U.S.A. A calculation is presented on the dimensions of a pilot project on the same scale as the artificial recharge in California. This pilot project is situated SW of Lake Chad in Nigeria. Artificial recharge, though perhaps not on that scale, is certainly feasible if intended to provide water for development. It is not recommended to start construction of an artificial recharge project at its full capacity. Generally, a phased growth of capacity is essential for the sound development of artificial recharge projects.

Keywords

Pilot Project Artificial Recharge Global Precipitation Filling Period Artificial Groundwater Recharge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert J. Roebert
    • 1
  1. 1.AmsterdamThe Netherlands

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