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Electroplating Simulation

  • L. J. Gray
  • G. E. Giles
  • J. S. Bullock
  • P. W. McKenzie
Part of the European Consortium for Mathematics in Industry book series (ECMI, volume 5)

Summary

A simulation of a three dimensional electroplating process which includes a model of the heat flow generated during the plating is presented. The steady state temperature distribution in the cell is coupled to the electric field through the nonlinear polarization (overvoltage) boundary conditions and the temperature dependence of the electrolyte conductivity. As the conductivity directly influences the deposition rate, variations due to temperature can have an impact on the shape of the plated part. The thermal and electrostatic problems are simultaneously solved using the boundary element method, and a simple iterative scheme is employed to satisfy the boundary conditions. A newly developed boundary element procedure for crack geometries is used to cope with the thin shielding present in the cell. Utilizing this technique, a computationally expensive and cumbersome multidomain decomposition of the region is avoided.

Keywords

Boundary Element Boundary Element Method Nonlinear Boundary Condition Plating Process Flux Boundary Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. [1].
    Brebbia, C.A.; Telles, J.C.F.; Wrobel, L.C.: Boundary Element Techniques. Berlin: Springer Verlag 1984.zbMATHGoogle Scholar
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    Brebbia, C.A.; Telles, J.C.F.; Wrobel, L.C.: Boundary Element Techniques. Berlin: Springer Verlag 1984.zbMATHGoogle Scholar
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    Gray, L.J.; Giles, G.E.: Boundary element method for regions with thin internal cavities II. Engineering Analysis (submitted)Google Scholar
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    Gray, L.J.; Askew, A.L.; Giles, G.E.: Contact heat transfer by the boundary element method. Proceedings of the European Boundary Element Conference,Brussels 1988 (in press).Google Scholar
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    Gray, L.J.; Giles, G.E.: Application of the Thin Cavity Method in Electroplating. Proceedings of the Boundary Element 10 Conference Southampton: Computational Mechanics 1988.Google Scholar
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    Gray, L.J.: Evaluation of Hypersingular Integrals in the Boundary Element Method.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© B. G. Teubner Stuttgart and Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. J. Gray
    • 1
  • G. E. Giles
    • 2
  • J. S. Bullock
    • 3
  • P. W. McKenzie
    • 3
  1. 1.IBM Bergen Scientific CentreBergenNorway
  2. 2.Computing and Telecommunications DivisionMartin Marietta Energy SystemsOak RidgeUSA
  3. 3.Y-12 Development DivisionMartin Marietta Energy SystemsOak RidgeUSA

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