Perspectives from Labor Studies in South Asia

  • Jayati Ghosh

Abstract

The problems of agricultural labor in many developing countries tend to be broadly similar but it is difficult to make a comparison between two such vast regions as South Asia, and West Asia and the Mediterranean. Also, it is difficult to describe the salient features of rural labor markets in South Asia, primarily because of substantial regional variations in patterns of growth of output and farm investment, property relations, tenurial conditions, labor use, and the labor process.

Keywords

Employment Growth Land Reform Agricultural Labor Rural Poverty Labor Surplus 
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Copyright information

© ICARDA 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jayati Ghosh
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Economic Studies and PlanningJawaharlal Nehru UniversityIndia

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