Agricultural Labor and Technological Change in the Yemen Arab Republic

  • Richard Tutwiler

Abstract

In the early 1970s, rising petroleum prices brought new wealth to the major oil-exporting Arab states. This funded ambitious development projects, but these were impeded by an acute shortage of manpower. The Yemen Arab Republic (YAR), with a predominantly agricultural population estimated at 6–7.5 million, soon became their principal labor supplier and by 1975, 24–42% of Yemen’s male labor force was working abroad.

Keywords

Eastern Slope Labor Shortage Central Plateau Rural Labor Overseas Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ICARDA 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Tutwiler
    • 1
  1. 1.The International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA)AleppoSyria

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