Advertisement

Restoration of an Oligomeric Form of the Light-Harvesting Antenna CP II and of a Fluorescence State II-State I Transition by Δ3-Trans-Hexadecenoic Acid-Containing Phosphatidylglycerol, in a Mutant of Chlamydomonas

  • Jacques Garnier
  • Benrui Wu
  • Jeannine Maroc
  • Denise Guyon
  • Antoine Tremolieres

Abstract

Phosphatidylglycerol (PG) containing Δ3-trans-hexadecenoic acid (C16:1-trans) is a phospholipid characteristic of the photosynthetic membranes. Several works concerning higher plants (1–4) or the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (5,6) have suggested that C16:1-trans could be involved in the formation and the stability of an oligomeric form of the main light-harvesting Ch1 a + b antenna (LHCP or CP II) and, consequently, in the efficiency of the light energy capture and transfer. However, other observations have not agreed with such a suggestion (7,8). We report here a restoration experiment using two mutants of C. reinhartdii; mf 2, a PS II-lacking but low-fluorescent mutant which is unable to synthesize C16;1-trans, does not show any oligomeric form of CP II and shows anomalies affecting the regulation of the excitation energy distribution; Fl 39, a classical PS II-lacking high-fluorescent mutant, used as a control.

Keywords

Fluorescence Emission Spectrum Oligomeric Form Photosynthetic Membrane Unicellular Green Alga Alga Suspension 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Dubacq, J.-P. and Trémolières, A. (1983) Physiol. Vég. 21, 293–312Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Rémy, R., Trémolières, A. and Ambard-Bretteville, F. (1984) Photo-biochem. Photobiophys. 7, 267–276.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Huner, N.P.A., Krol, M., Williams, J.P., Maissan, E., Low, P.S., Roberts, D., and Thompson, J.E. (1987) Plant Physiol. 84, 12–18PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Krol, M., Huner, N.P.A., Williams, J.P. and Maissan, E. (1988) Photosynth. Res. 15, 115–132CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Maroc, J., Trémolières, A., Gamier, J. and Guyon, D. (1987) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 893, 91–99CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Manuil’skaya, S.V., Ladygin, V.G., Mikhono, A.I. and Shirshikova, G.N. (1987) Biochemistry (transl. from Biokhimiya) 52, 626–631Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Browse, J., McCourt, P. and Somerville, C.R. (1985) Science 227, 763–765PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    McCourt, P., Browse, J., Watson, J., Arntzen, C.J. and Somerville, C.R., (1985) Plant Physiol. 78, 853–858.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Gamier, J., Maroc, J. and Guyon, D. (1987) Plant Cell Physiol. 28, 1117–1131Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Gamier, J., Maroc, J. and Guyon, D. (1986) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 851, 395–406CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacques Garnier
    • 1
  • Benrui Wu
    • 1
  • Jeannine Maroc
    • 1
  • Denise Guyon
    • 1
  • Antoine Tremolieres
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Biochimie Fonctionnelle des Membranes VégétalesC.N.R.S.Gif-sur-Yvette CedexFrance

Personalised recommendations