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Skin Cancer and Ultraviolet Light: Risk Estimates Due to Ozone Depletion

  • Janice Longstreth

Abstract

Stratospheric ozone depletion poses a threat to human health principally via the increase in ambient ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation which it permits, but also potentially through a contribution to air pollution in the troposphere. UV-B has many direct impacts on the human body; most of them are undesirable but some, such as the generation of the active form of Vitamin D, are useful. It is probably a safe generalization, however, that the detrimental effects of UV-B exposures far outweigh the beneficial ones.

Keywords

Skin Cancer Cutaneous Melanoma United States Environmental Protection Agency Ozone Depletion Xeroderma Pigmentosum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Science Publishing Co., Inc 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janice Longstreth
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Science PolicyClement AssociatesFairfaxUSA

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