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Manprint pp 161-203 | Cite as

Conceptual System Design and the Human Role

  • Harold E. Price

Abstract

There is no such thing as an unmanned system. Every military, industrial, commercial or social system has people involved in its operation or maintenance. Sometimes they are remote from the system, but they are, nevertheless, in control. If these systems are to perform effectively, efficiently and safely, the human role must be a deliberate design effort during concept design while critical choices can still be made. Otherwise, the human role decision will be made by default. Later in system development, when degrees of freedom are limited, we will be forced to make those human design choices to operate and maintain the system as it has evolved; or else, we will be forced to make retrofits and changes to the system which can be costly. Human factors technology and the human role must be deliberate design efforts during conceptual system design — this is the theme of this chapter.

Keywords

Human Factor Human Error Computer Error User Acceptance Weapon System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

Notes

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1990

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  • Harold E. Price

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