Manprint pp 343-390 | Cite as

Manprint Tools and Techniques

  • Harold R. Booher
  • Glen M. Hewitt

Abstract

Analytical tools and techniques for human performance prediction and assessment exist for each of the MANPRINT domains. MANPRINT brings the various human performance methodologies under a common umbrella so that the analysis findings are (a) coordinated among the domains, and (b) can be integrated in a timely manner with total system analytical methodology used by top management decision makers, system designers, managers and implementors, and system support planners and trainers. This chapter addresses (a) the background important to understanding the value of MANPRINT tools; (b) the use of MANPRINT tools in acquisition decisions; (c) MANPRINT domain tools and the current state of the art of some of the better methodologies, e. g., operator workload (OWL), HARDMAN (Hardware and Manpower) III, and advanced human factors engineering (HFE) technologies; (d) factors in tool identification and selection; and (e) some research and development (R&D) issues and future needs for MANPRINT.

Keywords

Weapon System Aberdeen Prove Ground Acquisition Decision Human Factor Engineering Army Research Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bogner, M.S., Kibbe, M., & Laine, R. (1990). Directory of design support methods. Developed for Department of Defense Human Factors Engineering Technical Group (Designing for the User Subgroup). Washington, D.C.: Headquarters, Department of the Army, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, MANPRINT Directorate.Google Scholar
  2. Booher, H.R. (1990). MANPRINT implications for product design and manufacture. International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, (to appear).Google Scholar
  3. Casper, PA, Shively, RJ., & Hart, SG. (1986). Workload consultant: A microprocessor-based system for selecting workload assessment procedures. Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics. Piscataway, NY: IEEE Sen/ice Center.Google Scholar
  4. Casper, PA, Shively, RJ, & Hart, SG. (1987). Decision support for workload assessment: Introducing WC FIELDE. Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 31st Annual Meeting. Santa Monica, CA: Human Factors Society.Google Scholar
  5. Christ, R.E., Bulger, J.P., Hill, S.G., & Zaklad, A.L. (1990). Incorporating operator workload issues and concerns into the system acquisition process: A pamphlet for Army managers. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Army Research Institute.Google Scholar
  6. Christ, R.E., Zaklad, A.L., Bittner, A., Jr., Hill, S., & Linton, P. (1989). The Army Operator Workload (OWL) Program: Review and prospects. Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 33rd Annual Meeting, Vol. 2, pp. 1471–1475. Santa Monica, CA: Human Factors Society.Google Scholar
  7. Doppelt, F.F. (1987). Introduction and overview. In W. B. Rouse and K.R. Boff (Eds.), System design. New York: North Holland.Google Scholar
  8. Elkind, J.I., Card, S.K., Hochberg, J., & Huey, B.M. (Eds.) (1989). Human performance models for computer-aided engineering. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.Google Scholar
  9. Farr, B.J. (1990). Personal communication. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Army Research Institute.Google Scholar
  10. Fleger, S., Permenter, K., & Malone, T. (1988). Advanced human factors engineering tool techniques. Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD: U.S. Army Human Engineering Laboratory.Google Scholar
  11. Gentner, F.C. (1989). Manpower; personnel, and training integration technology needs-Tools for IMPACTS. Dayton, OH: Air Force Systems Command.Google Scholar
  12. Hanser, L.M. (1989). Personal communication. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation.Google Scholar
  13. Hanser, L.M., & Arabian, J.M. (1989). Personal communications. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation and Alexandria, VA: U.S. Army Research Institute.Google Scholar
  14. Harris, R., Bennett, J., & Stokes, J. (1982). Validating CAR: A comparison study of experimentally-derived and computer-generated reach envelopes. In R.E. Edwards & P. Tolin (Eds.), Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 26th Annual Meeting (pp. 969–973). Santa Monica, CA: The Human Factors Society.Google Scholar
  15. Harris, R.M., Hill, S.G., & Christ, R.E. (1990). Handbook for operating the OWLKNEST Technology (HOOT) (TR 2075–5C). Willow Grove, PA: Analytics, Inc.Google Scholar
  16. Hickey, D.T., Pierrynowski, M.R., & Rothwell, P.L. (1985). Man-modeling CAD programs for workspace evaluations. Downsview, Ontario: Defense and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine.Google Scholar
  17. Hill, S.G., & Harris, R.M. (1989). OWLKNEST: A knowledge-based expert system for selecting operator workload techniques. In A. Genaidy and W. Korwowski (Eds.), Computer-aided design: Applications on ergonomics and safety London: Taylor and Francis.Google Scholar
  18. Jones, M.B. (1966). Individual differences. Acquisition of skill. Conference on acquisition of skill. New York: Academic Press, Inc.Google Scholar
  19. Kaplan, J.D., & Holman, C. (1989). HARDMAN III decision support system. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Army Research Institute.Google Scholar
  20. Kaplan, J.D., & Miles, J.L., Jr. (1981). Human factors in weapons design: The performance gap. Concepts (Journal of Defense Systems Acquisition Management), IV(4), pp. 76–89.Google Scholar
  21. Leibrecht, B. (1988). Health hazards: Their habits and haunts. MANPRINT Bulletin, Vol. II, No. 6.Google Scholar
  22. Kirkpatrick, M. III, & Malone, T.B. (1984). Development of an interactive microprocessor based workload evaluation model (SIMWAM). In M.J. Alluisi, S. DeGroot, and E.A. Alluisi (Eds.), Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 28th Annual Meeting (Vol. 1, pp. 78–80). Santa Monica, CA: The Human Factors Society.Google Scholar
  23. Laughery, K.R., Jr. (1984). Computer modeling of human performance on microcomputers. In M.J. Alluisi, S. DeGroot, and E. A. Alluisi (Eds.), Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 28th Annual Meeting (Vol. 2, pp. 884–888). Santa Monica, CA: The Human Factors Society.Google Scholar
  24. Lysaght, R., Hill, S., Dick, A., Plamondon, B., Linton, P., Wierwille, W., Wherry R., Jr., Zaklad, A., & Bittner, A., Jr. (1989). Operator workload: Comprehensive review and evaluation of operator workload methodologies. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Army Research Institute.Google Scholar
  25. McGuinness, J., Wagner, J., Nicholas, J.M., & Rhoads, C.J. (1986). Expert system design for application of human factors in robotics (Contract No. N60921–85-C-0252). Alexandria, VA: Person-System Integration.Google Scholar
  26. Meister, D. (1976). Behavioral foundations of system development New York: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
  27. Morrissey, S.J., Herring, B.E., & Gennetti, M.G. (1985). Applicability of using the CAR-II model in design and evaluation of multioperaior workstations with shared controls. In R. W. Swezy, T.J. Post, L.B. Strother, and M.G. Knowles (Eds.), Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 29th Annual Meeting (Vol. 2, pp. 698–699). Santa Monica, CA: The Human Factors Society.Google Scholar
  28. Perrow, C. (1984). Normal accidents. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  29. Potempa, K., & Gentner, F.C. (1988). Manpower; personnel, training and safety in the Air Force weapon systems acquisition. Brooks Air Force Base, TX: Human Systems Division.Google Scholar
  30. Rimland, B. (1983). Human individual differences. In R.C. Sorensen (Ed.), Human individual differences in military systems. San Diego, CA: Navy Personnel Resarch and Development Center.Google Scholar
  31. Pulat, B.M. (1982). A computer aided workstation assessor for crew operators: WOSTAS (ONR Contract No. N00014–81-C-0320). Greensboro, NC: North Carolina A & T State University. (NTIS No. AD¬AH 6 045).Google Scholar
  32. Pulat, B.M. (1983a). Computer aided techniques for crewstation design work space organizer-WORG: Workstation layout generator-WOLAG (ONR Contract No. N00014–81-C-0320). Greensboro, NC: North Carolina A & T State University. (NTIS No. AD-A132 981).Google Scholar
  33. Pulat, B.M. (1983b). A computer aided workstation assessor for crew operations-WOSTAS. In A.T. Pope & L.D. Haugh (Eds), Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 27th Annual Meeting (Vol. 2, pp. 887–891). Santa Monica, CA: The Human Factors Society.Google Scholar
  34. Rossmeissl, P.G., Akman, A., Kerchner, R., Faucheux, G., Wright, E., & Shields, J.L. (1990). Analysis of manpower, personnel, training, and safety during the acquisition of Air Force Systems: Requirements and capabilities. Washington, DC: Hay Systems, Inc.Google Scholar
  35. Rostker, B. (1984). Human resources models: An overview. In W.P. Hughes, Jr. (Ed.), Military modeling. Alexandria, VA: Military Operations Research Society.Google Scholar
  36. Shields, J.L., Rossmeissl, P.G., & Johnson, K. (1989). Manpower; personnel, training, and safety in the Air Force weapons systems acquisition process. Dayton, OH: National Aerospace and Electronics Conference.Google Scholar
  37. Snow, R.E. (1986). Individual differences and the design of education programs. American Psychologist, 41(10), pp. 1029–1039.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Sorensen, R.C. (1983). Human individual differences in military systems. San Diego, CA: Navy Personnel Research and Development Center.Google Scholar
  39. Steinberg, S., & Neilson, G.A. (1977). A proposal for evaluating human exposure to carbon monoxide contamination in military vechicles (Technical Memorandum 11–77). Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD: U.S. Army Human Engineering Laboratory.Google Scholar
  40. Weddle, P. D. (1986, July). Capturing the benefits of high technology. Personnel Administration.Google Scholar
  41. Westerman, D.P., Malone, T.B., Heasly, C.C., Kirkpatrick, M., Eike, D.R., Baker, C.C., & Perse, R.M. (1989, October). HFE/MANPRINT IDEA: Integrated Decision/Engineering Aid. Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD: U.S. Army Human Engineering Laboratory.Google Scholar
  42. Williams, R.J. (1956). Biochemical individuality. New York: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harold R. Booher
  • Glen M. Hewitt

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations