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Electron Transfer within Reaction-Centre Complexes

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  • R. P. F. Gregory
Part of the Tertiary Level Biology book series (TLB)

Abstract

The electron is a negatively charged particle and migrates according to the local electrostatic potential, being more likely to move so as to occupy an orbital of the same or a neighbouring molecule with a lower energy, that is, with a more positive potential. In so doing, the electrical work done appears as heat. The greater the heat released at any stage, the less reversible the transfer. The path followed by an electron in escaping from a reaction centre may be studied by means of electrochemistry, a key principle of which is the concept of redox potentials.

Keywords

Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Reaction Centre Redox Potential Green Plant Purple Bacterium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

Further reading

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Copyright information

© Blackie and Son Ltd 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. P. F. Gregory
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ManchesterUK

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