Primary Photophysics

Times from 1 fs to 100 ps
  • R. P. F. Gregory
Part of the Tertiary Level Biology book series (TLB)

Abstract

Molecules consist of atoms, held together by chemical bonds. A chemical bond depends upon electrons being shared in such a way that the (negatively charged) electron density is located between the (positively charged) atomic nuclei thus providing electrostatic attraction (a chemical bond). Electrons in atoms or molecules are not to be regarded as points, but distributed into waveforms known as orbitals. Orbitals have their characteristic size, energy and shape in space. Each orbital can hold two electrons, which must have opposite directions of their spin. Orbitals centred on one atomic nucleus are known as atomic or non-bonding orbitals, while those connecting two (or more) nuclei are molecular orbitals.

Keywords

Reaction Centre Atomic Nucleus Purple Bacterium Special Pair PSII Core 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

Further reading

  1. Barber, J. (1987) Photochemical reaction centres: a common link. Trends Biochem. Sci. 12, 321–326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  3. Knaff, D.B. (1988) The photosystem I reaction centre. Trends Biochem. Sci. 13, 460–461.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Parson, W.W. (1987) see Chapter 4.Google Scholar
  5. Youvan, D.C. and Marrs, B.L. (1987) Molecular mechanisms of photosynthesis. Scientific American 256 (6), June, 42–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Cited references

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Copyright information

© Blackie and Son Ltd 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. P. F. Gregory
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ManchesterUK

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