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IBD, the oral contraceptive pill and pregnancy

  • R. N. Allan

Abstract

This chapter summarizes our current knowledge of the role of the oral contraceptive pill in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), followed by a review of fertility in women and men. The next section considers IBD and pregnancy, including the impact on the fetus and the mother with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. The chapter then considers the safety of drug treatment and the outcome of surgical treatment during pregnancy and the problems that may be encountered during pregnancy in patients with an ileostomy or ileoanal pouch. The chapter closes with a review of the short- and long-term prognosis of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease after parturition.

Keywords

Inflammatory Bowel Disease Ulcerative Colitis Oral Contraceptive Pill Excess Relative Risk Oral Contraceptive User 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers and Axcan Pharma, Inc. 1994

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  • R. N. Allan

There are no affiliations available

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