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Factors Affecting Triticale as a Food Crop

  • Roberto J. Peña
Part of the Developments in Plant Breeding book series (DIPB, volume 5)

Abstract

Estimates indicate that the area dedicated to triticale production is now slightly above 2 million hectares (Pfeiffer WH, personal comm.). Triticale is used successfully in animal feeding because it is similar to, or slightly better than, other cereal grains as a source of protein and energy [1]. Although it is recognized that triticale can be used to prepare some food products [2], its utilization as a food grain is rather limited due to reasons associated with: grain compositional factors, breeding priorities, region-specific grain preferences of consumers, competitiveness with other grains, and economic, marketing, and processing aspects. Triticale could become a major crop if it were used as a human food grain in addition to an animal feed grain, particularly if it were so on a commercial scale. The objectives of this paper are to discuss, in general, grain and nongrain compositional factors associated with utilization of triticale as a food crop. There is also a brief discussion on the potential improvement of some compositional factors. More emphasis will be given to grain than to nongrain factors since there is much more documentation on the former than on the latter.

Keywords

High Molecular Weight Glutenin Subunit Loaf Volume Gluten Content Flour Yield Gluten Quality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto J. Peña
    • 1
  1. 1.International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)Mexico, D.F.Mexico

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