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Laminar-Turbulent Transition in Pipe Flow

  • F. T. M. Nieuwstadt
  • A. A. Draad
  • G. D. C. Kuiken
Conference paper
Part of the Fluid Mechanics and its Applications book series (FMIA, volume 36)

Abstract

Recently, a horizontal pipe facility has been completed in our laboratory. It has a length of 31m and an inner diameter of 40mm. A sketch of the facility is given in Fig. 1. The working fluid is water. The facility has been designed for transition studies. So, in order to maintain laminar flow up to very high Reynolds numbers, much care has been devoted to avoid any disturbances which may trigger transition. A settling chamber is used to eliminate swirl and suppress turbulence in the entrance flow by means of several honeycombs and screens. In the design of the shape of the contraction. which connects the settling chamber to the pipe, attention has been given to minimise adverse pressure gradients and to suppress the generation of (Görtler vortices.

Keywords

Reynolds Number Pressure Drop Pipe Flow Settling Chamber Disturbance Velocity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Darbyshire, A.C.& Mullin, T. (1995) Transition to turbulence in constant-mass-flux pipe flow, J. of Fluid Mech. 289, pp. 83–114.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Wygnanski, I.J., Champagne, F.H. (1973) On transition in a pipe. Part 1. The origin of puffs and slugs and the flow in a turbulent slug. J. of Fluid Mech59, part 2, pp. 281–335.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. T. M. Nieuwstadt
    • 1
  • A. A. Draad
    • 1
  • G. D. C. Kuiken
    • 1
  1. 1.Lab. for Aero- & HydrodynamicsTU-DelftDelftThe Netherlands

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