Making Unnatural Products by Natural Means

  • Steven J. Langford
  • J. Fraser Stoddart
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSE, volume 320)

Abstract

The use of the template-directed methodology as a means of achieving self-assembly has led to a large number of mechanically-interlocked catenanes and rotaxanes being constructed from different, but cheap and readily available components. By varying the nature of the components that make up the supramolecular arrays, as well as molecular assemblies, fundamental information has been gleaned about the steric and electronic interactions that stabilize complexes and molecular geometries at a noncovalent level. This account describes some of the molecular assemblies and supramolecular arrays we have produced over the years and our attempts to gain some understanding of the mechanisms of their formation and the dynamic processes the assemblies and arrays exhibit when the molecular compounds or supramolecular complexes are dissolved in solution.

Keywords

Crown Ether Molecular Assembly Ethylene Unit Triethyl Phosphite Ring Component 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven J. Langford
    • 1
  • J. Fraser Stoddart
    • 1
  1. 1.School of ChemistryUniversity of BirminghamEdgbaston, BirminghamUK

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