Modernization and Adaptation Among Indigenous Peoples in Chukotka (Russia)

  • Harald W. Finkler
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSPS, volume 5)

Abstract

This paper examines the social consequences of modernization, or more specifically the manifestations of rapid social change under conditions of industrialization in the Russian north. In particular, the discussion focusses on the negative social impacts on aboriginal peoples that have arisen as a result of industrialization. A situation exacerbated further by recent political change and the transition to a market economy. By way of illustration, the paper summarizes the findings of research conducted in the Iul’tinsk raion of Chukotka and endeavours to formulate a macro policy framework for implementing the requisite mitigative measure to address the current crisis, particularly in regard to the disadvantaged and vulnerable position of its aboriginal inhabitants.

Keywords

Residential Schooling Aboriginal Youth Aboriginal Inhabitant Vulnerable Position Rapid Social Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harald W. Finkler
    • 1
  1. 1.Indian Affairs And Northern DevelopmentOttawaCanada

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