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Monitoring of Human Exposure to Xenobiotics;

Identification and Quantification of Cancer Initiators in Vivo
  • M. Törnqvist
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASIC, volume 475)

Abstract

The term xenobiotics, i. e. chemicals foreign to the biologic system, covers a wide range of chemical compounds, which differ with regard to stability and other chemical properties. One extreme example is polychlorinated biphenyls, which are very persistent and e. g. do not even degrade in fuming sulfuric acid. They accumulate in adipose tissues and could be determined in biological samples with high analytical sensitivity by gas chromatography (GC) or gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), due to the content of chlorine atoms. On the other hand, so called genotoxic agents are xenobiotics which are reactive or form reactive intermediates in vivo and which usually have too short life-time to be analysed in biological samples. One further complication is that some compounds of this type also could occur as natural compounds in vivo at the same time as they occur as xenobiotics in e. g. urban air pollution.

Keywords

Ethylene Oxide Adduct Level Globin Chain High Analytical Sensitivity Genotoxic Compound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Törnqvist
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental ChemistryWallenberg Laboratory Stockholm UniversityStockholmSweden

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