Modeling Seasonal Patterns of Blowing Dust on the Southern High Plains

  • James M. Gregory
  • Jeffrey A. Lee
  • Gregory R. Wilson
  • Udai B. Singh

Abstract

The Southern High Plains of the United States are notorious for blowing dust, especially during the “dust bowl” of the 1930s. Dust is an environmental and health hazard that can be mitigated with understanding and management. To aid in the understanding of wind erosion, a process-based mathematical simulation model has been developed at Texas Tech University. This paper overviews the components of the model, and illustrates its use with a long-term simulation of expected dust hours for each month of the year. Predicted values were compared to average monthly dust hours reported for Lubbock, Texas, from 1947 to 1989. Predictions matched measured values well, especially considering that the measured data were not used to calibrate or obtain regression coefficients. It is concluded that the Texas Tech model is a reasonable simulator of soil movement, dust concentration, and visibility.

Keywords

Friction Velocity Wind Erosion Roughness Element Wind Profile Length Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Vatche P. Tachakerian 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • James M. Gregory
    • 1
  • Jeffrey A. Lee
    • 2
  • Gregory R. Wilson
    • 3
  • Udai B. Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringUSA
  2. 2.Department of Economics and GeographyUSA
  3. 3.Department of Plant and Soil ScienceTexas Tech UniversityUSA

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