An Instrument to Detect Pain Feigning: The Pain Feigning Detection Test (PFDT)

  • Gerald Young
Chapter
Part of the International Library of Ethics, Law, and the New Medicine book series (LIME, volume 56)

Abstract

A pain feigning inventory does not yet exist in the field, despite the need for such an instrument in tort, disability, compensation, and other types of forensic and mental health evaluations. The chapter proposes an instrument on the detection of pain feigning that consists of 67 items. Its primary innovation is to compare patient’s self-report of ongoing pain experience with baseline estimates of physical injury or condition and expected associated pain. Once fully developed, the instrument should provide data toward determining respondents’ validity of presentation about their pain experience and, in particular, about the possible presence of malingering and related response biases. The scores deriving from the instrument need to be interpreted as part of a comprehensive assessment with a full reliable data set gathered. The instrument should help evaluators in undertaking comprehensive, scientifically-informed, impartial assessments that meet professional and court requirements. It is called the Pain Feigning Detection Test (PFDT).

Keywords

Pain Experience Chronic Pain Patient Validity Scale Psychological Injury Simulation Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald Young
    • 1
  1. 1.Glendon CollegeYork UniversityTorontoCanada

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