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Leading the Field in Understanding and Testing Malingering and Related Response Styles: The Work of Richard Rogers

  • Gerald Young
Chapter
Part of the International Library of Ethics, Law, and the New Medicine book series (LIME, volume 56)

Abstract

The present chapter examines in detail the work of Richard Rogers on malingering and related response styles and biases. He is a leader in the field who has explored appropriate concepts, definitions, fallacies, detection strategies, research designs, etc. He is also the first author of leading psychological instruments in the field, the SIRS (Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms; Rogers et al. 1992) and the SIRS-2 (Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms, Second Edition; Rogers et al. 2010). In the first section of the monograph, I have already presented his critique of the MND (Malingered Neurocognitive Dysfunction) criteria of Slick et al. (1999).

Keywords

Detection Strategy Response Style Report Symptom Extreme Group Forensic Context 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald Young
    • 1
  1. 1.Glendon CollegeYork UniversityTorontoCanada

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