Wood Load-Carrying Capacity of Timber Connections: An Extended Application for Nails and Screws

Part of the RILEM Bookseries book series (RILEM, volume 9)

Abstract

The wood engineering community has dedicated a significant amount of effort over the last decades to establish a reliable predictive model for the load-carrying capacity of timber connections under wood failure mechanisms. Test results from various sources (Foschi and Longworth 1975; Johnsson 2003; Quenneville and Mohammad 2000; Stahl et al. 2004; Zarnani and Quenneville 2012a) demonstrate that for multi-fastener connections, failure of wood can be the dominant mode.

Keywords

Failure Mode Failure Plane Ultimate Capacity Wood Failure Nail Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© RILEM 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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