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Fluid–Structure Interaction Modeling of Patient-Specific Cerebral Aneurysms

  • Kenji Takizawa
  • Tayfun E. Tezduyar
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computational Vision and Biomechanics book series (LNCVB, volume 12)

Abstract

We provide an overview of the special techniques developed earlier by the Team for Advanced Flow Simulation and Modeling (T★AFSM) for fluid–structure interaction (FSI) modeling of patient-specific cerebral aneurysms. The core FSI techniques are the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space–Time formulation and the stabilized space–time FSI technique. The special techniques include techniques for calculating an estimated zero-pressure arterial geometry, a special mapping technique for specifying the velocity profile at an inflow boundary with non-circular shape, techniques for using variable arterial wall thickness, mesh generation techniques for building layers of refined fluid mechanics mesh near the arterial walls, a recipe for pre-FSI computations that improve the convergence of the FSI computations, techniques for calculation of the wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index, and arterial-surface extraction and boundary condition techniques. We show, with results from earlier computations, how these techniques work. We also describe the arterial FSI techniques developed and implemented recently by the T★AFSM and present a sample from a wide set of patient-specific cerebral-aneurysm models we computed recently.

Keywords

Wall Shear Stress Oscillatory Shear Index Nonlinear Iteration Arterial Geometry Medium Mesh 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by a seed grant from the Gulf Coast Center for Computational Cancer Research funded by John & Ann Doerr Fund for Computational Biomedicine. It was also supported in part by the Rice Computational Research Cluster funded by NSF Grant CNS-0821727. The 3DRA research at the Memorial Hermann Hospital University of Texas Medical School at Houston was supported by generous a funding from the Weatherhead Foundation. We thank Dr. Ryo Torii (University College London) for the inflow velocity data used in the computations and the arterial geometry used in Sect. 6.1.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Modern Mechanical Engineering and Waseda Institute for Advanced StudyWaseda UniversityShinjuku-kuJapan
  2. 2.Mechanical EngineeringRice UniversityHoustonUSA

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