Extended Range Tropical Cyclone Predictions for East Coast of India

  • M. Rajasekhar
  • C. M. Kishtawal
  • M. Y. S. Prasad
  • V. Seshagiri Rao
  • M. Rajeevan

Abstract

East Coast of India is vulnerable for tropical cyclone hazards which form over Bay of Bengal (BoB). The average annual frequency of tropical cyclones over the BoB and Arabian Sea (AS) is about five (about 5-6% of the global annual average) and about 80 cyclones form around the globe in a year. The frequency is more in the BoB than in the Arabian Sea, the ratio being 4:1. The monthly frequency of tropical cyclones in the north Indian Ocean display a bi-modal characteristic with a primary peak in November and secondary peak in May.

Keywords

Tropical Cyclone India Meteorological Department North Indian Ocean Tropical Cyclone Activity Tropical Cyclone Genesis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Capital Publishing Company 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Rajasekhar
    • 1
  • C. M. Kishtawal
    • 2
  • M. Y. S. Prasad
    • 3
  • V. Seshagiri Rao
    • 3
  • M. Rajeevan
    • 4
  1. 1.Meteorology Facility, Range Operations, Sathish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC SHAR)Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO)SriharikotaIndia
  2. 2.Atmospheric Sciences Division, Meteorology and Oceanography GroupSpace Applications Centre (ISRO)AhmedabadIndia
  3. 3.SDSC SHAR (ISRO)SriharikotaIndia
  4. 4.Ministry of Earth Sciences (MoES)New DelhiIndia

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