John Dewey and Science Education

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines John Dewey’s statements on inquiry and science and relates them to current trends in science education. Beginning with a brief biographical sketch of Dewey, the chapter proceeds to outline his statements on science and science education with attention to the role and scope of inquiry, or method. Attention will be paid to the experiential, epistemic, social and political role of inquiry, science and science education. After discussing Dewey’s understanding of inquiry, science and science education, more recent developments in Dewey scholarship in science education will be noted. Themes common to Dewey and science education (including the role of constructivism and inquiry in the science curriculum) will be broached.

Keywords

Science Education Abstract Concept Later Work Aesthetic Experience Scientific Thinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Memorial UniversityNewfoundlandCanada

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