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History and Philosophy of Science in Japanese Education: A Historical Overview

  • Yuko Murakami
  • Manabu SumidaEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This article describes the historical development of HPS/NOS mainly in higher education. Because the establishment of universities in Japan in late-nineteenth century was a reaction against Western imperialism, higher education aimed to cultivate scientists and engineers with an emphasis on practical applications. This direction in higher science and engineering education continues into the present. It has conditioned elementary and secondary education via university entrance examinations, where no questions on NOS appear. Hence, HPS research and education has developed in Japanese higher education with little connection to elementary and secondary education. Instead, NOS is communicated in literature, movies, and other media. Scientific and technological communication occurs mainly outside the school curriculum in venues like museums.

Keywords

Science Education Elementary School General Education Junior High School Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of ScienceTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of EducationEhime UniversityMatsuyamaJapan

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