Advertisement

Development of a One-Step Immunochromatographic Strip Test for Rapid Detection of Antibodies Against Classic Swine Fever

  • Huiying Ren
  • Shun Zhou
  • Jianxin Wen
  • Xinmei Zhan
  • Xinmei Zhan
  • Xianjie  Han
  • Shangin Cui
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 269)

Abstract

An immunochromatographic strip (GICA strip) was developed for the simple and rapid detection of antibodies against classical swine fever virus (CSFV). In the GICA strip, the expressed protein of E2 was labeled with colloidal gold and was used as the detector, and the staphylococcal protein A (SPA) and swine antibody against CSFV blotted on the nitrocellulose membrane were used for the test and control lines, respectively. Conjugation of E2 protein with colloidal gold was optimal at 5.25 μg of protein per mL of colloidal gold. The optimum concentration of the E2 protein applied at the test line was 1.5 mg/mL. The GICA strip was specific for antibodies against CSFV, produced negative results with sera from noninfected pigs or other animals, and was as sensitive or nearly as sensitive as ELISA and HI. According to the comparison of GICA strips with IDEXX ELISA kits, the coincidence rate was 93.26 %. The strips produced results within 5–15 min and can be stored at 4 °C for 3 years or 37 °C 1 year. The strip can be useful for both country veterinarians and field epidemiologists.

Keywords

Antibody Classical swine fever Rapid test Strip 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The study was supported by grants from the Program of R&D (No. 2011GB2C600011).

References

  1. 1.
    Shangjin C, Chen C, Tong G (2008) A simple and rapid immunochromatographic strip test for monitoring antibodies to H5 subtype avian influenza virus. J Virol Methods 152:102–105CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Shangjin C, Tong G (2008) A chromatographic strip test for rapid detection of one lineage of the H5 subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza. J Vet Diagn Invest 20(5):567–571CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    C Shangjin, S Zhou, C Chen, T Qi, C Zhang, J Oh (2008) A simple and rapid immunochromatographic strip test for detecting antibody to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus. J Virol Meth 152:38–42Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Xiao-Nan D, Ke W, Zu-Qiang L, Ying-Hua C (2002) Candidate peptide vaccine induced protection against classical swine fever virus. Vaccine 21:167–173CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Greiser-Wilke I, Blome S, Moennig V (2007) Diagnostic methods for detection of classical swine fever virus—status quo and new developments. Vaccine 25:5524–5530CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    L Yan, Z Jian-Jun, L Na, S Zixue, C Dan, Z Qing-Hu, T Changchun, T Guang-Zhi and Q Hua-Ji (2007) A multiplex nested RT-PCR for the detection and differentiation of wild-type viruses from C-strain vaccine of classical swine fever virus. J Virol Meth 143(1):16–22Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Thullier P, Guglielmo V, Rajerison M (2003) Short report : serodiagnosis of plague in humans and rats using a rapid test. Am J Trop Med Hyg 69(4):450–451Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Z Sheng-hua, C Shang-jin, C Chang-mu, Z Chaofan, L Jun, Z Shun, O Jin-Sik (2009) Development and validation of an immunogold chromatographic test for on-farm detection of PRRSV. J Virol Meth 160:178–184Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Huiying Ren
    • 1
  • Shun Zhou
    • 1
  • Jianxin Wen
    • 1
  • Xinmei Zhan
    • 1
  • Xinmei Zhan
    • 1
  • Xianjie  Han
    • 1
  • Shangin Cui
    • 2
  1. 1.Qingdao Agricultural UniversityQingdaoChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Division of Swine Infectious DiseasesHarbin Veterinary Research Institute of Chinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesHarbinChina

Personalised recommendations