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“4 Steps” in Problem Based Teaching in the Medical Internship: Experiences from China

  • Huasheng Liu
  • Mei Zhang
  • Richard Bae
  • Muxing Li
  • Xiaoping Xi
  • Qin Gao
  • Yan Li
  • Di Wu
  • Bingyin Shi
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 269)

Abstract

Background The clinical internship represents a crucial time in medical education. Our study looks at the effects of our problem-based teaching “4 steps” method in the training of the interns in our center. Methods 35 final-year medical students were enrolled in our study. We investigated the main problems they encountered as well as their suggested resolutions to these problems using personal interviews and e-mail. We guided every medical student through our problem-based teaching “4 steps” method. The supervision of the interns was adjusted according to the feedback from the survey. We later rated the effects of the changes by soliciting their feedback. Results All the students received training in critical thinking and practice which helped them better make the transition from being a medical student to a junior medical doctor. Most of the 35 students received an offer from our hospital, which is one of the best hospitals according to the Ministry of Public Health. Conclusion Our problem-based teaching “4 steps” strategy was shown to improve the quality of our medical internship.

Keywords

Problem based teaching 4 steps method Reflective practice Medical internship 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Many thanks to the surveyed students and all the staff in the Department of Hematology, the 1st Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University.

Funding/Support:

2011 Shaanxi ordinary undergraduate universities teaching reform research project named “Construction and application of eight-year problem-based learning (PBL) integrated course’s teaching mode and evaluation system for clinical medical specialty in Xi’an Jiaotong University”

Other disclosures: None

Ethical approval:

The methods of this project have been performed with the approval of The Medical Ethics Committee of The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University School of Medicine and the written informed consent for participation in the study were obtained from participants. The more detail can be check in the attachment.

Previous presentations: None

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Huasheng Liu
    • 1
  • Mei Zhang
    • 1
  • Richard Bae
    • 2
  • Muxing Li
    • 1
  • Xiaoping Xi
    • 1
  • Qin Gao
    • 2
  • Yan Li
    • 2
  • Di Wu
    • 1
  • Bingyin Shi
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of HematologyFirst Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University School of MedicineXi’anPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Medical EducationFirst Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University School of MedicineXi’anPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of EndocrinologyFirst Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University School of MedicineXi’anPeople’s Republic of China

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